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- Ezra Pound discussion list of the University of Maine <[log in to unmask]>
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From:
Pierre Marc Bellemare <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Sat, 16 May 2009 09:05:43 -0400
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Can we entertain another possibility?

The question is : did Ezra Pound sometime go to the movies?

The year 1933 saw the world-wide success of Alexander Korda's production
of THE PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII, starring Charles Laughton, and Merle
Oberon - one in a series of Korda films that was to contribute to the
establishment of cinema as an art-form in the post-silent era. The film
begins with the execution of Ann Boleyn and, then, after two short
episodes (one tragic - Jane Seymour; the other comical - Ann of Cleves),
the Howard story is dealt with prominently.

Pierre Bellemare 

On Sat, 16 May 2009, Wayne Pounds wrote:

> Thanks, Jacob. My question was about a specific source remembered at Pisa. 
> Somebody put their finger on it right away--Fordie's The Fifth Queen. Check the 
> responses. 
> 
> Wayne
> 
> 
> 
> ---- Original message ----
> >Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 12:14:35 -0700
> >From: Jacob Korg <[log in to unmask]>  
> >Subject: Re: "as the Howard or Boleyn knows"  
> >To: [log in to unmask]
> >
> >Dear Wayne:
> >         Your query has just caught my attention, and I'm sure others  
> >have answered it by this time. The fates of those two wives are  
> >generally known, and Pound would not have to have any special source  
> >for thinking of them as examples of his frequent criticism of British  
> >policies and history.
> >             All the best, Jacob Korg
>