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- Ezra Pound discussion list of the University of Maine

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Ezra Pound discussion list of the University of Maine <[log in to unmask]>
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Harold Rhenisch <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Tue, 27 Jan 1998 08:57:44 -0800
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Tim Romano pointed out that Pound's language is "relatively
natural,  straightforward, even colloquial".
 
You bet it is. That's not what I meant by stilted. I meant that it shows
its place in time and that place is distant. As a model, it is not stilted,
mind you.
 
And yes, at least it isn't circumplectious polysyllabic, a fashion which
Pound's example of straightforward talk sadly never managed to expurgate.
 
Would not the current talk among some new formalists of imagism being
retrograde and destructive of poetry and language be leaning in that
direction? But that's a different matter.
 
Dan Pearlman thought out loud:
 
>>if the Cantos were to become available
in hypertext format on the 'Net (infinite Borgesian
links, etc.) we would see a tremendous upsurge in
interest in EP among the twenty-nothing and thirty-
nothing generation that has hardly even heard of
him.  ND might be smart to offer, let's say, the
first 30 Cantos in this format on the Net for
free and hope to rope in buyers of a CD-hypertext
version of the whole work.  Maybe even the book
itself.<<
 
Perfect. I hope they start tomorrow. I reckon we got the 20th century
wrong. We might as well line up again at the starting gate.
 
regards,
 
Harold Rhenisch
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